CBR: What do you love about Iris?

Candice Patton: What I love about Iris, and what I’m trying to incorporate more in my life is, she’s so positive and so fun-loving. I think she always finds the light at the end of the tunnel, and she’s that for Barry: She’s the light at the end of the tunnel. No matter what he’s dealing with every day, as Barry or the Flash, at the end of the day, he comes home and Iris is still that kind of light in his life. That’s what I’m learning to remember in my own life [more]


tagged as:  text    p: candice patton    newsflash    sarcastic RAY OF SUNSHINE    sob    

grantgust: Comin’ for ya #SDCC. @cavanaghtom
grantgust: Comin’ for ya #SDCC. @cavanaghtom

tagged as:  p: grant gustin    p: tom cavanagh    sdcc 2014    
tagged as:  p: grant gustin    p: tom cavanagh    sdcc 2014    
vickorano:

e1n:

I am currently taking a class called “Visual Communications”, which apparently is the very first foundation class people take when they go to an art school.  The purpose of this class is to train you so that you are confident with your lines and won’t need to scribble too much while sketching.
Our first week’s homework is training on hand stability.  I’ve heard a lot of artists complain that they have “shaky hands” and so when they ink their drawings, it comes out crap, so I thought I’d share my homework with you guys.
Draw a line about 2 inch long, as straight as you possibly can without a ruler.  Go over this line EIGHT times without making the line any thicker.  Repeat this exercise 10 times.
Draw a line about half a page long, as straight as you possibly can without a ruler.  Go over this line EIGHT times without making the line any thicker.  Repeat this exercise 10 times.
Draw a line from one end of the page to the opposite end, as straight as you possibly can without a ruler.  Go over this line EIGHT times without making the line any thicker.  Repeat this exercise 10 times.
Repeat the above exercise, but with an arc, and then with a wave.
We’re supposed to do this every day before we draw as a warm-up.  Basically just keep drawing lines, arcs, and waves until you fill up an entire 8.5x11 page.  Use felt-tip pens like microns/multiliner/sharpie.  Keep doing this for the rest of your drawing life and your inking will get significantly better.

Here, people who have trouble making smooth lines in their work:  do this, and your penstroke will be as confident as ever.

vickorano:

e1n:

I am currently taking a class called “Visual Communications”, which apparently is the very first foundation class people take when they go to an art school.  The purpose of this class is to train you so that you are confident with your lines and won’t need to scribble too much while sketching.

Our first week’s homework is training on hand stability.  I’ve heard a lot of artists complain that they have “shaky hands” and so when they ink their drawings, it comes out crap, so I thought I’d share my homework with you guys.

  1. Draw a line about 2 inch long, as straight as you possibly can without a ruler.  Go over this line EIGHT times without making the line any thicker.  Repeat this exercise 10 times.
  2. Draw a line about half a page long, as straight as you possibly can without a ruler.  Go over this line EIGHT times without making the line any thicker.  Repeat this exercise 10 times.
  3. Draw a line from one end of the page to the opposite end, as straight as you possibly can without a ruler.  Go over this line EIGHT times without making the line any thicker.  Repeat this exercise 10 times.

Repeat the above exercise, but with an arc, and then with a wave.

We’re supposed to do this every day before we draw as a warm-up.  Basically just keep drawing lines, arcs, and waves until you fill up an entire 8.5x11 page.  Use felt-tip pens like microns/multiliner/sharpie.  Keep doing this for the rest of your drawing life and your inking will get significantly better.

Here, people who have trouble making smooth lines in their work:  do this, and your penstroke will be as confident as ever.


tagged as:  art    resource    

More thoughts on fandom social conservatism (re: Attack the Block) 

reblogfornoreason:

The way that Attack the Block hasn’t permeated the Internet/”fandoms” in the way that a tight, cool, fun cult SF film should reveals a lot about the thinking of many consumers of that genre.

The main thing is a big fat vein of social conservatism, which is more of a feature of Science Fiction/Fantasy texts (and enthusiasts) than many might admit. The response to this film’s main characters—poor, mostly black inner city youths—is often couched in the language of ghettoisation. Here’s two comments on the film’s YouTube trailer, both posted in the last week:

"if the main protagonists were not cool gangbang badass kids the movie would be worth a 8/10 for me but in this state I just cant bare to give it some solid score"

"Can’t stand chavs/chav talk lol, sole reason I avoided this film"

This wholesale dismissal of the film because of this feature of its script—which the director developed by spending months working with young people who lived in these areas of London, and which the spectacularly talented but mostly non-professional-actor cast also helped to develop—is both depressing and somewhat alarming.

Note here that the resistance to the film’s dialogue is expressed using off-the-peg cultural stereotypes (“gangbang”, “chav”) that are regularly used to dehumanise and dismiss the social legitimacy of large sections of (already marginalised) people. They’re not people, they’re gangbangers, they’re chavs; listen to how they talk. Ugh lol i can’t believe someone made a movie about them.

There’s also an enormous double standard going on here regarding the way that people perceive the sympathetic nature of “morally ambiguous” characters. There’s no getting past the fact (and nor should there be, necessarily) that the main characters in Attack the Block are petty criminals, who mug people and threaten them in the street. But they are also complex, human characters capable of taking responsibility for their actions and making difficult, courageous decisions (indeed, that journey is one of the story arcs of the movie). And yet, they’re just gangbangers; they’re just chavs.

But I’m willing to be that a lot of people who dismiss Attack the Block on this basis are the same people who praise to the skies the character of The Joker, or Moriarty, or some other cartoon (but much more murderous) villain. So it seems that moral ambiguity and criminal characters are fine, as long as that ambiguity is telegraphed in huge primary colours with clown makeup and campy, OTT performances by actors who are already established as respectable and mainstream.

I have more thoughts about this but I’m struggling to articulate them right now.


tagged as:  f: attack the block    meta    isms    

how long do i have to wait until the vids from sdcc start surfacing


tagged as:  show: the musketeers    meta    

mswyrr:

theladymonsters:

theladymonsters:

i have said it before and i will say it again:

in the age of social media when the creators of popular media works are paying close attention to how fans interact with the texts they provide us, continuing to prioritize men on a fandom level is not harmless, it is actively undermining female representation on what is supposed to be a counter-cultural level.

#fact: the less gifsets/edits/posts you make about female characters #the less gifsets/edits/posts will be rb’d by official tumblrs #therefore perpetuating (white) male dominance in popular fandoms #(with few exceptions) #also yes - creators will see that you love (white male character a) more than (character b) and prioritize them #shit fucking happens man don’t let it happen to you

this is a bit too policing for my tastes - yes, we should be aware of the content we are creating and the fact that we are, in our various ways, *content creators*

and responsible for our creations, as far as that goes

and it’s awesome if we each try to remember as we create things to make sure we’re aware of who we’re shining the light of our love on and the messages embedded in how we do that

but also part of the problem here is that imo official companies need to BACK THE FUCK OFF and let fandom be fandom sometimes

and they still hold responsibility for their far more powerful voices and the whole nasty web of how they carry our their business on multiple levels

and people gotta enjoy themselves, yanno. at the end of the day, they gotta enjoy themselves

do i like it when whole swaths of my dash content is 80% white boys IN LUUURRRVE? no. and i certainly am not shy about being vocal when people cross over into misogyny/shaming other ways of shipping/etc

but you gotta follow your feels too

with as much awareness as you can, but… shit, man. fanfolk gotta fan.


tagged as:  text    dudeslash    fandom    queued    

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